Mission Statement
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Easily one of the standout features of this year's festival, the Osborne brothers' dark, bitter satire places these filmmakers somewhere between the Farrellys and the Coens. Filled with absurdist touches, cruel-spirited parody, and bravura fantasy sequences, the film recalls in tone and texture works by Albert Brooks and John Waters. Alert viewers may even detect some resemblances to Tony Richardson's forgotten masterpiece The Loved One.

The bizarre tale concerns Emile (Kent Osborne), a twentysomething slacker and television addict squandering his life in the malaise of a San Fernando Valley suburb. He's glued to the set for a documentary on squirrels when, oddly enough, a squirrel on his roof disconnects his cable line. Now that the actual and television worlds have collided-and the result is nothing but snow on the screen-Emile decides to kill himself. As his wrist spurts blood, Emile receives a call from the manager of a failing Ventura Boulevard motel offering him a position as night-shift janitor. It appears that he has been saved by the bell, but later, when the supermarket runs out of chicken pot pies, Emile declares to oafish night-shift manager Henry (David Koechner behaving for all the world like the next Bill Murray) that he is again suicidal.
History Today
Filled with absurdist touches, cruel-spirited parody, and bravura fantasy sequences, the film recalls in tone and texture works by Albert Brooks and John Waters. Alert viewers may even detect some resemblances to Tony Richardson's forgotten masterpiece The Loved One.
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The bizarre tale concerns Emile (Kent Osborne), a twentysomething slacker and television addict squandering his life in the malaise of a San Fernando Valley suburb. He's glued to the set for a documentary on squirrels when, oddly enough, a squirrel on his roof disconnects his cable line. Now that the actual and television worlds have collided-and the result is nothing but snow on the screen-Emile decides to kill himself. As his wrist spurts blood, Emile receives a call from the manager of a failing Ventura Boulevard motel offering him a position as night-shift janitor. It appears that he has been saved by the bell, but later, when the supermarket runs out of chicken pot pies, Emile declares to oafish night-shift manager Henry (David Koechner behaving for all the world like the next Bill Murray) that he is again suicidal.

He plans to leave a video suicide note for his ex-girlfriend, and the venal Henry agrees to deliver the document as long as he can keep the state-of-the-art mini digital camera he has persuaded Emile to purchase for the project. Henry brings his buddy Andrew (Vince Vieluf) along to collect the goods, but they discover an apologetic Emile struggling to complete his video. Andrew, a know-it-all Hollywood brat whose father directed a few episodes of "Mama's Family," hears Emile's monologue and has an epiphany: "He's not just talking to his girl. He's speaking to a generation." Andrew and Henry decide to expand this event and make an independent film of Emile's suicide. Before long, Andrew gets some real money from producers, and Emile's suicide grows into a full-scale production with budget, crew, extras, and trailers parked on his curb. The real world and the film world have collided again.
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